Monday, March 21, 2011

US M-67 E-Tool, Tri-Fold Shovel Model 1967

Since I've been running quite a few posts lately on the different e-tools, and folding shovels in my collection, I thought I ought to drag out my modern US issue E-tool.  

Today's post is on my US M-67, (Model 1967), Tri-Fold, E-Tool shovel.


This is the current model E-tool that the US Military is issuing out.  It was first issued in 1967, replacing the Model 1951 folding E-tool that had the pick-shovel combo, and the old style, long wooden handle.  Like all of the previous models of folding E-tools, this shovel can be used in the regular shovel mode or as a pick-hoe.


The shovel has s steel blade with aluminum shaft and handle with a spring loaded set-up inside the shaft to keep tension on the whole rig as it is folded and unfolded.  The blade has corrugated teeth along one side as well.


You will find the date stamp, and US stamp, on either side of the folding handle.  My shovel is dated 1987 and was manufactured by the Ames company.  It is stamped US on the side of the handle.  There are many aftermarket "fakes" out there, but you can always tell the authentic US issue shovels by the date, and US stamps on the sides of the folding handle.  Many other countries have adopted this style of e-tool for their issue as well, including Germany, so you may find identical versions of this shovel without the US stamps, as well as many cheap knock-offs from China...... but only the authentic US issue shovels will have the date and US stampings on the sides of the handle.



 There have been several versions of carrying cases for the M-67 E-tool, from nylon to had plastic.  Mine is a a hard plastic model with ALICE clips on the back.  It was manufactured by Skilcraft and is dated 1989.



Here are a few more pictures of the Model 1967 E-tool:


 Here is a quick comparison between my M-43 E-tool and the M-67 E-tool.


In keeping with my tradition of ending with a historical shot, here is a picture of a couple of US soldiers in Afghanistan with their E-tools in hand and in use.

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